Road and place names in Alresford

The road and place names within the Alresford area are a clue to the people and history of the area, but many times these are lost as the generations pass on. There are people who remember these origins, and presumably there are records in the minutes of Town Council meetings, but even the latter would not necessarily tell us why those people were important.

There are people’s lives, generosity and work behind the names, and the reasons can make full stories of their own: but here we will try to list most of those known, from various sources. We are indebted to Josephine Croxton for her listing, that was originally created for the First Alresford Brownie Pack, presumably as a test for one of their badges. Also Pat Young has provided her list of the people who gave their names to some of the roads. Other additions will be welcomed, because new roads are popping up all the time!

Alders Court – related to Alex Hankin and his house ‘Alders’ on West Street next to the Co-op.

Appledown Close – The book entitled “Tales of the Ship Inn, Bishops Sutton” edited by Glenn Gilbertson, advises that while previously known as ‘Sutton’, the village was first named Bishops Sutton on “Greenwood’s map of Hampshire of 1826. This map also marks “Gunners Castle” from the civil war, and Apple Down, which was South of the old Cricketer’s Inn, just outside the Western boundary of the [Sutton] parish along White Hill Lane.” This would put ‘Apple Down’ on the modern golf course, at the end of SunLane: presumably this gives the source for the name used for Appledown Close.

Arle Gardens – site of the farm belonging to the Dorey family…maybe it was a market garden?

Ashburton Road – Lord Ashburton lived at Itchen Stoke.

Brewhouse Yard – Site of one of the larger Alresford breweries, but also possibly the site of the source of the Great Fire of Alresford in the 1600s.

Covey Way – Named after Dr C.E.Covey, presumably a GP. Pat Young’s parents had a large gilt framed picture over their bed, which was inscribed “To Dr C.E.Covey from the Poor of Basingstoke”, but she did not know the history, or why her parents came to own it!

Culley View – Pat also says she knew Mrs Culley as an elderly lady who lived in a large house on Sun Hill, which was demolished when the new estate was built. Glenn Gilbertson has been writing a story about the family and life of this lady, Elizabeth Frances Culley, for the new “Alresford Articles” publication by the Alresford Historical and Literary Society, so readers will have to wait for this in 2013.

De Lucy Avenue – from Bishop De Lucy, who helped to create New Alresford by building the Great Weir and forming Alresford Pond.

Dorian Grove – named after the bungalow that was demolished when the new houses were built. Pat Young says this bungalow belonged to Mr and Mrs Lovell who bred pug dogs.

Drove Lane – an old sheep drove route.

Ellingham Close – Named after a local baker. Pat Young advises this was Mr T J Ellingham, who had a grocery and baker’s shop in West Street where Design Realities and Tiffins Tea Room are now. The Ellingham family lived in a large house on Grange Road, which was demolished to build the houses of Ellingham Close.

Fair View, Paddock Way, Shepherd’s Down – These were the three large houses and grounds surrounding the Cricketer’s Pub, which were sold and demolished to make way for the new estate of houses which now bear their three names.

Hasted Drive  – the Hasted family owned a butcher’s shop in West Street: Pat Young’s mother worked for the Hasteds as a cashier.

Haig Road – Named after Earl Haig (Your Country Needs You etc in WW1, although I don’t think he posed for the poster). In Haig Road there was the British Legion Hall, but this was demolished many years ago. This name dates from after WW1 obviously: before then it was called Southampton Road, but no-one seems to know why.

Hankins Court – Built on the rear of the site of Alex and son John Hankin’s garage in West Street, the entrance off Jacklyn’s Lane is where the garage had a rear access to the car park and spares store, providing parking for vehicles waiting for repair in the workshop.

Jesty Road – named after a long serving headmaster of the Junior School in the Dean.

Langton House, Farm – ??

Lindley Gardens – After Col Lindley, who gave the land for the swimming pool by the river in 1949, in the War Memorial garden, which then, in around 1970(?) was filled in.

Lovell Walk was named after the Lovell family quoted above.

Makin’s Court: named after Sir William Makin, a resident of Langtons, at the corner of Sun Lane and East Street, across from the Sun Inn.

Mallard Close – On the site of the Dean school, but Freda Kelsall (Chair of Alresford Parish Council, and member of the family that owned the Kelsall’s Grocery in Broad Street, now Tesco) proposed the name after hearing that the ducks had followed Reg Osgood up The Dean while walking the family dogs.

Meryon Road – named after Dr Charles Meryon, a local GP, who lived in Broad Street and had two children. Pat commented that they used to run around naked through most of the Summer!

Mill Hill – the road down to the two town mills on the discharge from the Pond.

Mitford Road – there’s a clue on the house in Broad Street, that has a plaque saying that Mary Russell Mitford lived there.

Nursery Road – George Wells and Graham Marshall’s Nursery Garden was sited at the area known now as Nursery Road. In fact they owned half the land that is now Nursery Road, Mr Conway, who lived at Langtons Farm on Sun Lane, owned the other half.

Perins Close – Dr Henry Perin was the first headmaster of the school now known as Perin’s School

Pound Hill – A 1958 booklet from Perins School says that up until around 1890 there was a Pound at the beginning of the Avenue in which any animals found wandering along the road out of a field would be impounded. The owner had to apply to the Police to have it released, and pay for its keep in the Pound. It was a large sized field with railings round it, and gave rise to the name Pound Hill.

Robertson Road – Named after Canon Robertson, who was rector in Alresford. Pat remembers him well: he had a bushy beard and wore a round black hat with a large brim. At the Dean Junior school Pat and her class had hymns and prayers with him every Wednesday morning.

Robins Close – Roy Robins was president of the Alresford Society: who died in May 2007. Before that he created the Alresford and District Museum Trust as a charity, in 2006, but this has led to the Alresford Museum and, in association, to this website (This website takes no funds from that charity).

Rosebery Road – Pat says it was named after Lord Rosebery, who was a racehorse owner?

Salisbury Road – After Lord Salisbury?

Searles Close – Named after a local vet.

The Soke – ?

Stratton Bates recreation ground – Presented to the town by Col Stratton Bates of Langtons, in East Street, in around 1911: again an article in Alresford Articles in 2013 will explain the problems this produced in more detail.

Sun Lane – The Old Sun public house on East Street was on the corner of Sun Lane, and a long time ago was a smugglers rendezvous: the road changed its name to Sun Lane because of this, but only at around the beginning of the 20th century. Before that the road was called Tichborne Down Road (leading to Tichborne Down. But Pat Bentley remembers the Old Sun as a pub in the 30s/40s: it was then bought by John Arlott, the cricket commentator and broadcaster, who retired there first, before moving to the Channel Islands.

Tanyard Hill – site of a local tanyard for animal skins, and abattoir.

2 responses to this post.

  1. Appledown Close: The book entitled “Tales of the Ship Inn, Bishops Sutton” edited by Glenn Gilbertson, advises that while previously known as ‘Sutton’, the village was first named Bishops Sutton on “Greenwood’s map of Hampshire of 1826. This map also marks “Gunners Castle” from the civil war, and Apple Down, which was South of the old Cricketer’s Inn, just outside the Western boundary of the [Sutton] parish along White Hill Lane.” This would put ‘Apple Down’ on the modern golf course, at the end of SunLane: presumably this gives the source for the name used for Appledown Close.

    Reply

  2. Rosebery was the PM, Archibald Primrose, Lord Rosebery.
    The Soke is land owned and under the jurisdiction of the Bishop and not the Burgesses.

    Reply

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