Archive for the ‘Community Projects’ Category

Old Alresford Revived – the 1977 Jubilee Exhibition

The Alresford Museum is delighted to have received the collection of documents and photos that were used in the 1977 Silver Jubilee exhibition held in Old Alresford. These items were assembled and displayed by Mrs Pru Randall, in The Forge, in Old Alresford, and Mrs Randall has now donated them to the Alresford Museum for safe keeping.

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The Old Forge in 2017

The display presented at the Forge was entitled “Old Alresford Revived”, and was an exhibition showing records and objects from Village Life through the Years. It ran from 6th to 11th June, all week, and then re-opened for one day on Saturday 18th June, 1977.

Winchester City Council and Verena Pegg supplied and described some of the ancient exhibits, like Saxon and Roman Pottery, Neolithic flints, and lethal looking animal traps. Colin Priestley produced the prints of the various photographs on display, and John Howard penned the labels and notices explaining each item. Others of the Old Alresford community rallied round to help, and put on a good display.

Other notable items included Mr Broad’s collection of Hampshire Chronicle cuttings about Old Alresford. There were Farm and Smithy tools, a collection of old bottles, and various clay pipes and other bits dug up in various back gardens. The documents that hopefully will be added to this website shortly include an account of events on Queen Victoria’s Jubilee in 1887, and a history of the Church and Old Alresford Place.

The Old Forge

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The Old Forge is the long low building on the road, next to Forge Cottage

The Exhibition was held at the Old Forge building, which was apparently in the course of renovation: it is now converted into a home. Presumably it was owned at the time by Mrs Randall. The sheet describing the event had a history of the Forge on the back page, as follows (written 1977):

“The building consists of a single storey approx. 43 feet from front to back by 16 feet wide, constructed of brick with a tiled roof and two large wooden doors at the front. It measures approx. 8 feet 6 to the eaves and 16 feet to the single ridge. Boarding over the rafters creates a second floor over the front section, which can be reached via a removable step-ladder.

DSCN5413The two forges still existed there, the one nearest the front having a set of leather, hand-operated bellows in working order, connected to the tuyere (the pipe through which air is forced into the furnace). The other is at the rear. Air was supplied to this forge by a fan with an extended shaft, to which was fitted a belt-driven pulley. The bottom halves of plummer block bearings still remain on the roof trusses, along the southern side of the building. These indicate that a line of shafting existed.

There is an old engine buried in the garden, and it might be reasonably surmised that this engine drove shafting that was connected by belts to drive the pulleys upon machinery, such as drilling and grinding machines on the bench below.

A place for the fitting of wrought iron tyres to wooden wheels exists in the grounds of the south side of the building. This consists of a wrought circular plate 5 feet 8 inches in diameter, 1” thick.

Mr Rampton was blacksmith at Old Alresford in the late 19th century. He was assisted by Jack Cousins, who lived at Prospect Cottages nearby, and George Trebick, who became the Smith at the Forge in Herriard.”

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Prospect Cottage, on the corner of Kiln Lane, occupied by Jack Cousins at the time

More stories

More stories will follow, from this Exhibition, but a really comprehensive review of Old Alresford history was published by Arthur Stowell, in his booklet “Tales of Old Alresford”, published 2004 by the Alresford Hist and Lit Society.

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Muck For Sale!

Once again Alresford Young Farmers are delivering well rotted muck from a local beef farm, high in potassium and phosphates, that are crucial for growing healthy plants.

Muck will be delivered in a large tractor on Sunday 19 February, between 0900 and 1400.

Price is £3/bag, £5/barrow load, all delivered to your door in and around Alresford. Larger quantities can be made available….

Half the proceeds go to the Alresford YFC, the other half to the YFC chosen charity for 2017: the Murray Parish Trust.

Order in advance please by phone to 0753 119 3468, or email to alres.hantsyfc@gmail.com

The story of Hambone Junior

Iris Crowfoot is another local collector of memories and stories about Alresford and the surrounding district. Her interest started as a project to learn more about Hambone Junior, the dog that was adopted by the US Forces based in Alresford in WW2. In doing this Iris has collected many wartime memories from local people, and other people too: these are published for all to read, on her website, www.HamboneJunior.com. There are a lot of interesting accounts on there, well worth reading!

In the February issue of the Alresford Forum, Iris presented a summary of the history pieced together so far about Hambone Junior, which is based on highlights from all her different stories. If the Forum story presented here interests you, you will find the longer accounts on her HamboneJunior.com website really fascinating!

From the Alresford Forum of February 2017:

“I often walk by Hambone Junior’s grave. Situated on a peaceful bank beside a sparkling trout stream in Alresford, sometimes it’s decorated with wildflowers by children on their way home from the park, and other times by a rubber ball dropped by a dog-walker. Poppies are placed there on Remembrance Sunday, to honour the memory of Hambone and his friends in the 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Division, US Army. It makes me wonder what the American soldiers actually did whilst they were in Alresford in May 1944 and how poor Hambone met his end.

By interviewing local people and researching the archives, I’ve discovered that Hambone was a ‘brown and white scruffy little terrier’ who lived in a World War II army camp in The Dene, Alresford, where Valdean Park is sited today. The 9th Division were the US Army’s experts in amphibious warfare: they had already invaded the beaches of Morocco and Sicily before they reached Alresford in November 1943. They certainly made the most of the town’s watery landscape as they prepared for the biggest amphibious operation ever attempted – the allied invasion of Normandy. The railway station clattered with steam trains delivering tanks and amphibious vehicles with aquatic names like the Water Buffalo (a tracked landing vehicle) and the Duck (a 6×6 wheeled armoured truck). The shop windows rattled in West Street as the GIs drove them down to the camp. And Hambone would have added to the racket by barking as he ran around the busy men servicing and waterproofing the vehicles.

Not all the soldiers were expert mechanics. Sergeant Eddie Knasel’s son told me, ‘It was almost unbelievable, to think of Dad in the Ordnance Corps – he just wasn’t a practical person. He couldn’t even change the oil in the car when we were growing up!’ Nevertheless, Kentucky-born Eddie supervised a team of GIs who maintained Sherman tanks in The Dene. He was 24 at the time, a bit older than most, and had completed more of his education before being called up – perhaps that was why he was given more responsibility.

The soldiers dammed the River Arle where it crosses Drove Lane, to create a pool. Then they drove the Water Buffalo and Ducks up the medieval sheep track to test their waterproofing by splashing through the pool. A landing stage was built and whole platoons practiced getting out of a landing craft and wading through the river to the other side (I hope Hambone liked swimming). Godfrey Andrews remembers that the banks of the river were lined with sandbags when he swam near here as a child, just after the war.

The Americans made friends with local people, and their kindness is still remembered a lifetime later. Les Harness, of Grange Park, Northington, was a regular visitor to the camp, collecting their kitchen leftovers to feed his hogs. A mess meal for a GI looked like almost a week’s worth of rations to the British and I’ve read that people were horrified when they saw the Americans stub out their cigarettes on leftover food on their plates. But Hambone Junior’s comrades were generous, even helping Les with his petrol ration when they spent three weeks away from Alresford training under canvas, so that he could carry on collecting the waste food for his pigs.

Disaster struck as the soldiers mobilised for the invasion. Hambone was accidentally run over by a ‘Deuce-and-a-half’ (two and a half ton) truck. The men were very upset by this, but it gave Les the opportunity to repay their generosity by giving them a puppy which had recently been born at The Grange. They named the pup ‘Spider’ and took him with them when they marched down to Southampton in June 1944. The 47th Infantry Regiment landed on Utah Beach on ‘D-Day + 4’ and fought their way home through northern France, Belgium and Germany.

Hambone’s grave was originally marked by a wooden cross. By 1962, it had rotted away and the Alresford community replaced it with a memorial stone, which was unveiled by the American Vice Consul in Southampton. In 1994, some of the original GIs returned to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of D-Day in an event held in Broad Street, Alresford. They did not forget their faithful friend. Tucked away in a manila folder in the Hampshire Record Office, I found an archive photo of two old comrades placing a wreath on Hambone’s grave. A bunch of flowers was also left with the note, ‘I still remember you, Bill.’

I have not managed to find anyone who still remembers Bill … yet. If you once knew Hambone and Bill, or would like to share other memories of Hampshire during this special time, I’d love to hear from you.”

If you can add to Iris’s collection of memories about Hambone Junior, then please contact Iris either through her website, or by email.

The Voices of Bishop’s Sutton

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How about “Bishop’s Sutton Memories” as an offshoot of AlresfordMemories? OK, so there are several Bishop’s Sutton stories on this website, but in visiting the Alresford Library today I found a really enthralling new book: only just published. It is titled “Voices of Bishop’s Sutton”, and was written by Sarah Bussy, a resident of Bishop’s Sutton over the last 40 years, since 1974.

Sarah suggests that she felt very much like a ‘Townie’ person, when she first moved to Bishop’s Sutton, from her Alresford home – it was a different world to be in village life, after residing in the big Metropolis of Alresford! But having settled in, 30 years later, Sarah was involved in a parish-wide piece of team work, which resulted in a small, publicly-funded publication entitled ‘Bishop’s Sutton: An Appraisal of the Parish, 2006’. A questionnaire was circulated around all households in the village, to see what they liked and disliked about village life. Most people were really happy to live in Bishop’s Sutton, which Sarah describes as “a very friendly place, with a strong community spirit”: only one person expressed a dislike for the incoming “Townies”.

Sarah explains the background to the current book as follows:

“In the 1980s I became involved with making sound recordings of Winchester people, several of which are now in the Wessex Film and Sound Archive. Around the year 2000 I began tentatively to record in Bishop’s Sutton.

Because of other commitments, these Bishop’s Sutton tapes lay neglected, and a source of considerable guilt for years until I was suddenly spurred into further action by a Village Open Weekend held in the autumn of 2014. Several months of concentrated work followed and the book was ready for press shortly before my move to Devon in September 2015. The timing couldn’t have been better and I still feel pleased to have given something back to Bishop’s Sutton in gratitude for the 41 years I lived there with my family.”

Her book records the memories of the current residents, memories of what village life was like throughout their lives. Sarah recorded numerous current residents, dividing them up into sections that cover the 1920s; the Hillarys of Northside Farm; the accents; the houses, including colonial bungalows and council houses, as well as cottages; Domestic life (including sanitation, food and sickness); Childhood and the School; Working on the farms; Death in the village, and WW2. Selected parts of the recordings she made are published in each heading, but the original recordings are held by the Wessex Film and Sound Archive at the HRO. Apparently the recordings made of conversations with Kit Hole, Bill Hillary, Jean Hillary, Nora Hillary, and Vic Sheppard are available for visitors to listen to on request.

The book includes many old photos, provided by David Hole – some of these originated from Peter Mills’ archive. Other interviewees include Bill Smith, Barbara Upton, Joan Clift, and many more: many Alresford parents of young children will remember Bill Smith as the caretaker at Sun Hill School some years ago.

 

Shopping Trips using the Town Minibus

The NATT (New Alresford Town Trust) is an independent charity in Alresford that runs the Town Minibus, which is shortly (in March) to be replaced with a new bus, based on a Mercedes Sprinter. This vehicle will still have a tail lift to allow access for disabled passengers and wheelchairs, but will have a side entry with much smaller steps to climb up, when compared to the current vehicle.

Several Alresford residents have been asking about the shopping trips organised in the NATT Minibus. The schedule for these trips is published every month in the yellow “Whats On” leaflet, although sometimes this seems out of date. Basically the shopping trips normally follow the schedule described here:

Standard schedule for trips

First Tuesday in the month: 0845 start, for Sainsburys in Alton.

Second Wednesday in the month: 0845 start, for Tesco in Winnall.

Third Wednesday in the month: 1300 start, for Sainsburys in Alton.

Fourth Wednesday in the month: 0900 start, to Central Winchester.

Every Friday, several trips to and from Alresford Community Centre, starting from 0830 throughout the morning.

Second and fourth Saturdays in the month: 0830 start, on a trip to Petersfield.

How it works

The Minibus collects passengers from outside their houses, starting from the garage in Meryon Road, so people in the town centre will be picked up later than those in the outskirts, in general. So the start times quoted above are for the first pick-ups near the garage, other passengers will be picked up maybe up to 30 minutes later. The bus also returns passengers, with their shopping, to directly outside their homes. Each round-trip is chargeable, the minimal fare is just to cover the fuel and running costs of the Minibus. The drivers are all community volunteers.

To add your name to the list for any trip, subject to a seat being available, please contact Pam Stevens on 01962 734861, a few days before the required bus trip.

Pam would also be delighted to hear from anyone interested in acting as a volunteer driver, spending half a day taking one of these shopping trips out, maybe just once a month! New volunteer drivers are always welcome, for these and other Community trips.

Pigs Events for 2017

For 2017 there are several events being scheduled by the Alresford Pigs Association.

The Duck Race

Kithener-Pig-vectorMost important perhaps is the Duck Race, which is only held every two years. This is held in the beautiful grounds of the Weir House, thanks to the generous support of the Hollingberry family. The Race Day is to be on Father’s Day, Sunday June 18th, with races starting probably at around 12 noon.

Why not enter your own (plastic) duck? Contact the Pigs to hire a duck, paint it in your own colours, and give it the name you want to see win.

The Alresford Show

The Pigs help man the show, in terms of car parking, manning the gates, providing safety stewards, etc: the helpers come from many local sports clubs, school PTAs, playschool and toddler group organisers etc. To have your organisation included, and benefit from the funds provided to support these helper organisations, once again, contact the Pigs. The actual show date is Saturday 2nd September.

Summer evening drives for OAPs

Throughout the “Summer”, in other words during the months of June and July, the Alresford Pigs organise evening trips on the town Minibus, usually visiting a local beauty spot and a pub for a drink. Previous trips have gone into the New Forest and to the coast, for example at Bosham, or Portsmouth, or the Hamble.

The trips are on Tuesday evenings, and typically are between about 6pm and 10pm: there is no charge. This year there will be the new town Minibus, so will be in even more comfort! Parties are typically organised by local Groups, like via organisers at Makins Court, Ellingham Close and the Giles Group. Once again, contact the Pigs to be included in the list of potential passengers.

Pigs Outings Dates for 2017:

Giles Group, via Jeanne Nicholls: 20 June, 18 July

Ellingham Close, via Una Yeates: 13 June, 11 July

Makins Court, via Audrey Chalk: 27 June, 25 July

Bramble Hill, via Joan Wimbleton: 6 June, 4 July

Christmas trees

For 2017, the Christmas trees are scheduled for erection on Saturday 25th November 2017. To book a tree, again please use the standard Pigs contact numbers or visit the Pigs website. The date for the removal of the trees in 2018 will probably be Saturday 6th January! (That’s not funny, its my birthday…..)

The big Christmas tree in Broad Street will be put in place on 22nd November….. it comes down on 2nd January 2018. (Sounds like a long way ahead)

Arrival of Father Christmas!

Santa has woken up and set a date: its going to be 13th December. See you in Broad Street!

Local People Helping Local People

If you think that the Alresford Pigs, which is a local charity established to help people in the local area who are in difficulties of any form, could possibly help you personally with a problem, then use the contact information below and ask for someone to contact you.

Contact the Pigs:

The website is www.alresfordpigs.org

There is a special website for the Duck Race

Phone us: to leave a message dial 01962 658961

Email us: secretary@alresfordpigs.org

Alresford Christmas 2016

The Christmas trees on the shops in Alresford, organised by the Alresford Pigs, have always made the town look really special – but with the growth in the numbers of businesses and residents who subscribe to this scheme, the whole town has stepped up a gear. The trees have spread down the Dean, up Pound Hill, and up Jacklyn’s Lane, as well as to some of the out-lying parts of the town.

For 2016, several businesses, notably those in West Street, added a lot more in the way of decoration, internally and externally: and it was good to see that these seemed free of any real vandalism in the evenings.

It would be unfair not to mention that the window decorations inside the shops were also particularly attractive this year, notably in Caracoli and the Oxfam shop, and the Swan Hotel entrance was beautifully framed.

A large selection of photos for 2016, and for previous years, are shown on the FlickR album on https://www.flickr.com/photos/83468450@N03/albums/72157662148395779, which is also accessible via tinyurl.com/NewAlresford. Some of my favourites from 2016 are shown below.

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