Archive for the ‘Suitable for a local school history project’ Category

The story of Hambone Junior

Iris Crowfoot is another local collector of memories and stories about Alresford and the surrounding district. Her interest started as a project to learn more about Hambone Junior, the dog that was adopted by the US Forces based in Alresford in WW2. In doing this Iris has collected many wartime memories from local people, and other people too: these are published for all to read, on her website, www.HamboneJunior.com. There are a lot of interesting accounts on there, well worth reading!

In the February issue of the Alresford Forum, Iris presented a summary of the history pieced together so far about Hambone Junior, which is based on highlights from all her different stories. If the Forum story presented here interests you, you will find the longer accounts on her HamboneJunior.com website really fascinating!

From the Alresford Forum of February 2017:

“I often walk by Hambone Junior’s grave. Situated on a peaceful bank beside a sparkling trout stream in Alresford, sometimes it’s decorated with wildflowers by children on their way home from the park, and other times by a rubber ball dropped by a dog-walker. Poppies are placed there on Remembrance Sunday, to honour the memory of Hambone and his friends in the 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Division, US Army. It makes me wonder what the American soldiers actually did whilst they were in Alresford in May 1944 and how poor Hambone met his end.

By interviewing local people and researching the archives, I’ve discovered that Hambone was a ‘brown and white scruffy little terrier’ who lived in a World War II army camp in The Dene, Alresford, where Valdean Park is sited today. The 9th Division were the US Army’s experts in amphibious warfare: they had already invaded the beaches of Morocco and Sicily before they reached Alresford in November 1943. They certainly made the most of the town’s watery landscape as they prepared for the biggest amphibious operation ever attempted – the allied invasion of Normandy. The railway station clattered with steam trains delivering tanks and amphibious vehicles with aquatic names like the Water Buffalo (a tracked landing vehicle) and the Duck (a 6×6 wheeled armoured truck). The shop windows rattled in West Street as the GIs drove them down to the camp. And Hambone would have added to the racket by barking as he ran around the busy men servicing and waterproofing the vehicles.

Not all the soldiers were expert mechanics. Sergeant Eddie Knasel’s son told me, ‘It was almost unbelievable, to think of Dad in the Ordnance Corps – he just wasn’t a practical person. He couldn’t even change the oil in the car when we were growing up!’ Nevertheless, Kentucky-born Eddie supervised a team of GIs who maintained Sherman tanks in The Dene. He was 24 at the time, a bit older than most, and had completed more of his education before being called up – perhaps that was why he was given more responsibility.

The soldiers dammed the River Arle where it crosses Drove Lane, to create a pool. Then they drove the Water Buffalo and Ducks up the medieval sheep track to test their waterproofing by splashing through the pool. A landing stage was built and whole platoons practiced getting out of a landing craft and wading through the river to the other side (I hope Hambone liked swimming). Godfrey Andrews remembers that the banks of the river were lined with sandbags when he swam near here as a child, just after the war.

The Americans made friends with local people, and their kindness is still remembered a lifetime later. Les Harness, of Grange Park, Northington, was a regular visitor to the camp, collecting their kitchen leftovers to feed his hogs. A mess meal for a GI looked like almost a week’s worth of rations to the British and I’ve read that people were horrified when they saw the Americans stub out their cigarettes on leftover food on their plates. But Hambone Junior’s comrades were generous, even helping Les with his petrol ration when they spent three weeks away from Alresford training under canvas, so that he could carry on collecting the waste food for his pigs.

Disaster struck as the soldiers mobilised for the invasion. Hambone was accidentally run over by a ‘Deuce-and-a-half’ (two and a half ton) truck. The men were very upset by this, but it gave Les the opportunity to repay their generosity by giving them a puppy which had recently been born at The Grange. They named the pup ‘Spider’ and took him with them when they marched down to Southampton in June 1944. The 47th Infantry Regiment landed on Utah Beach on ‘D-Day + 4’ and fought their way home through northern France, Belgium and Germany.

Hambone’s grave was originally marked by a wooden cross. By 1962, it had rotted away and the Alresford community replaced it with a memorial stone, which was unveiled by the American Vice Consul in Southampton. In 1994, some of the original GIs returned to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of D-Day in an event held in Broad Street, Alresford. They did not forget their faithful friend. Tucked away in a manila folder in the Hampshire Record Office, I found an archive photo of two old comrades placing a wreath on Hambone’s grave. A bunch of flowers was also left with the note, ‘I still remember you, Bill.’

I have not managed to find anyone who still remembers Bill … yet. If you once knew Hambone and Bill, or would like to share other memories of Hampshire during this special time, I’d love to hear from you.”

If you can add to Iris’s collection of memories about Hambone Junior, then please contact Iris either through her website, or by email.

Lawrence Wright, Horsas and Hansas

A story published earlier on this website describes the retirement years of Lawrence Wright, when he lived in Alresford and made extensive drawings of the buildings in the town, plus mentions some books published on architectural accessories, like stoves, fireplaces, beds and toilets!

A correspondent then highlighted his earlier publication, dealing with his knowledge of, and activities in, the Second World War, in relation to the war gliders – ie glider-borne troops delivered across the Channel into Europe, in Horsa and the Airspeed Hansa aircraft.

This is the review information found on this earlier book…..

“THE WOODEN SWORD” by Lawrence Wright, published 1967.

In 1939, at the outbreak of war, gliding ‘was not taken so seriously at the Air Ministry as to deserve even to be stopped’, in the words of Lawrence Wright, one of the dedicated band of amateur glider pilots who spent weekends before the war soaring at Dunstable Downs. Yet, by 1943, official scepticism over the strategic usefulness of gliders had largely disappeared and before the end of the fighting thousands of Allied troops and tons of equipment had been delivered to battle areas in Horsas or Hamilcars, and such historic battles as Arnhem and the Rhine crossings had been fought by glider-borne forces.

Lawrence Wright tells the inside story of the war gliders — how it all began, the men who planned and those who died, and how it ended — for the first time. lt is, he writes, ‘a very personal account of what one non-combatant Air Force officer saw of the Allied airborne forces in general and of British glider-borne forces in particular’. Written with wry humour and no false heroics this is a fascinating story – a war book with a difference.

The above Review presents a pdf copy of one of the printed versions of Lawrence Wright’s book, this one published by Elek in 1967. Copies of the book itself are available from Abe Books, and other resellers.

Old Alresford School in the 1960s

Mike Whitley, 50 years ago, was a student teacher at King Alfred’s College, Winchester. As a part of this course, in Autumn 1963, he spent one day a week at Old Alresford Primary School: then in 1965 he did a full-time teaching practice there, for half a term. Recently he was asked to do a presentation at Winchester University about student life at the College back then, so he dug out old photos and memories, and has been kind enough to share those relevant with us. Some of these photos can also be seen, perhaps in greater detail, on the photo memory website, www.alresfordheritage.co.uk.

The two colour slides below show the old school building, taken from across the road, and some of the children in the school yard, at the lunch break playtime. The cars are those of the teachers.

Old Alresford CE Primary School, Hampshire

Old Alresford CE Primary School, Hampshire

Teaching practice

The photo below was on a December afternoon in 1963, and shows the afternoon PE football game, refereed by the class teacher, Mr Adams, in the field below the Southdowns National Children’s Home, which was almost next door. At this time, 45 of the pupils at the school were from Southdowns, a large proportion of the school total of 103 children. The others came from Old Alresford, and on the school bus from Wield. Mike was attached to Mr Adams’ class in 1963 (Class 3, the lower juniors, aged 7 and 8): while the boys played football, the girls had needlework indoors!

Old Alresford CE Primary School, Hampshire

In the spring term of 1965, Mike did a 4-week teaching practice period, working in the head-teacher Mr Lavis’s Class 4, which contained 24 upper juniors aged 9-11 – so this included some of his previous students. The Class 4 weekly timetables in 1965 are shown below, which Mike comments are rather formal compared to current practice!

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The school and its procedures

The old school building dated from 1846, but three further classrooms were added in stages after WW2, the most recent completed in 1963. The permanent teaching staff numbered 4, with the rector coming in to take the RE class. A peripatetic teacher, which in 1963 was Mrs Lavis, came in on Thursdays, so that he could concentrate on his administrative duties that day: she also acted as the school music teacher. Classes 3 and 4 were described above, Classes 1 and 2 were the infant classes, which also included a few of the younger 7 year olds.

The school AV equipment comprised a radio, a record player, and a film projector. As can be seen from the timetables, the BBC played a major part in the daily schedule for Class 4 at least! The students were divided into three “Houses”, or teams, named Raleigh, Drake and Nelson – interesting they had a naval flavour! Pupils won or lost house points for good or poor work or conduct. Each week a trophy went to the highest scoring house, and there was also a sports trophy. The school had no communal hall or dining hall, the children ate their school meals in a couple of the classrooms: also some of them went home for lunch. The meals were delivered from a central kitchen serving all the smaller schools, brought out in insulated metal containers.

In those days, free school milk was distributed every morning, in 1/3 pint bottles: Mike can remember the procedures with milk monitors collecting the crates and distributing the bottles, even with straws. He says this ended in 1971, so soon very few will remember the practice. One of the older classrooms in Old Alresford had a blackboard and easel, but most of the classrooms were equipped with roller blackboards – a modern, more efficient invention for presenting info to the kids.

Mike Whitley particularly commented on the effect of the large percentage of the children being from Southdowns, in that the school was very successful in gaining the confidence of all the children, and maintained a very happy and family atmosphere. The panoramic photo below, created by Mike from pictures taken on 5 December 1965, shows Southdowns on the left looking down on the school, just above the end of the pile of sticks: it is taken from the top of the field to the West of the road.

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Transport from Winchester

The group of around 5 student teachers sent to New Alresford travelled by a special coach from King Alfred’s College, and were dropped off near the Bell Hotel, before going on to schools towards Alton. From here Mike and a colleague walked down Mill Hill, and across the watercress beds to Old Alresford, and the others went to the Dean school, and maybe also to Perin’s. If they were kept late at Old Alresford school, they would miss the coach pick-up and have to take the train back to Winchester, though occasionally they saved the fares by hitching a lift (Mike comments that even as students they were dressed respectably, invariably wearing college scarves and carrying a rolled umbrella and briefcase, so the car drivers seemed happy to stop!). In February 1965 Mike took this photo of those cress beds from the footpath, made into a panorama.

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Other Old Alresford views

Two other pictures were supplied by Mike from the 1960s, one of the cottages at the north end of Old Alresford, from the top of the field again, and one of a dilapidated thatched barn – which he cannot locate, but it may have been along the road through Old Alresford, or along the path up to Mill Hill. Can anyone identify it?

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(C) All the photos used above are the copyright of Mike Whitley. The photo below has been supplied by www.alresfordheritage.co.uk, showing the school and the Basingstoke Road at around the same time.Old Alresford 046.jpg

Lawrence Wright and his Drawings

Lawrence Wright (1906-1983) was an ‘architectural perspective artist’, who lived in Alresford in his latter years. He was elected as an Associate Member of RIBA in 1930, and they record him living at 27 West Street in the 1960s. Detailed drawings of the houses and shops of West Street and on the East side of Broad Street were drawn and signed by him, in 1965. A lot of the originals of these are held in the Alresford Museum, plus some coloured prints taken from these drawings are on display in the Community Centre, in the downstairs main hall.

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A coloured print of Broad St/East St, as on display in the Community Centre

Lawrence also wrote several text books describing the historical development of various architectural or domestic accessories. These included “Warm and Snug: The history of the bed” in 1962, “Home Fires Burning: The History of Domestic Heating and Cooking” in 1964, which included fireplaces. The description of Lawrence as Author of ‘Warm and Snug‘ was:

Born in Bristol in 1906, he is a well-known architectural painter. He has designed many exhibitions, and it was from one of these, a history of the bath, under the title ‘Clean and Decent’, that his first book evolved. Its reception encouraged him to write ‘Warm and Snug’.

His pièce de resistance was “Clean and Decent: The history of the bath and loo and of sundry habits, fashions & accessories of the toilet, principally in Great Britain, France & America”. My personal interest in such history was triggered when as a young man in an office on the Embankment in London, one of their facilities featured a classic blue and white china bowl, in a design more familiar on Victorian tureens and porcelain tableware, showing a country garden scene. His book was first published in 1960, but has been re-printed many times since then.

I have no knowledge of any buildings or houses where Lawrence was employed as the architect, but there are unsigned drawings in the Alresford Museum collection of his papers showing a design for the re-build of the house and shop at 5a Broad Street, on paper marked as from Nightingale, Page and Bennett, Chartered Surveyors, of Kingston-on-Thames. These are dated 1961: the shop next door at number 5 Broad Street at that time was quoted as Broad Street Fruiterers, and next door at #7, in Livingstone House, was A. Livingstone and Sons. The work obviously went ahead as it showed the shop layout as used until 2015 by the D.Gedye electrical business.

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Whether he was involved with Roy Robins in the design and construction of 38, 40a and 40 West Street is not certain, but it appears that he lived opposite at number 27, in a small house on the South side of West Street: RIBA say that this was his address in 1965. This is now a listed building and private residence, situated on the corner of what is named “Lawrence Wright Passage”. Certainly, from there he could have looked out across the street at these very elegant buildings and roofs, captured in his 1965 drawing below.

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The original Lawrence Wright drawing

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The coloured print in the Community Centre

What immediately becomes apparent to anyone keen on historical data, is that the Lawrence Wright 1965 pictures give a great snapshot and record of the businesses present in the town centre in 1965. Plus they also show that there were far more residential buildings, than shops or business premises: although some were presumably used as Doctor’s Surgeries and for other professional services. Some, such as #40 above (now Jaga Designs), have a business sign which cannot be read from Lawrence Wright’s front of building views. There are too many drawings in the collection to reproduce them all here, but in time they will be made available on the Alresford Museum website, museum.alresford.org.

West Street (North side)

The identifiable business premises are listed as:

  • 6 (Shown as a shop window with no markings).
  • 8 Eureka Fish Company
  • 10 Electrical supplier (there is an advert for Murphy radios in the window)
  • 12 The Bell Hotel
  • 14 Tobacconists plus Walls ice cream sales
  • 16 JS Stiles (later moving to become the Broad St. hardware and china shops)
  • 18 Lex Leathers
  • 20 Tobacconists (Note the ‘No Waiting’ sign, for vehicles, in the picture!)
  • 22 Reg Cutting , Antiques and Bric-a-Brac
  • 24 Ann Verity, Hair Stylist
  • 40a ‘Mollys’: apparently a Restaurant or Cafe
  • 42 Christian Bookshop
  • 56 Chemist (named as H.C.*****)
  • 58 Newsagent
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For 2016 we have Susie Watson Designs, Alresford Haircare, the Naked Grape and the ex-Wedding Dress shop!

West Street (South side)

  • 1  (Unidentified shop front)
  • 7  Lloyds Bank
  • 11 The Swan Hotel
  • 13 Cycle, Motorcycle and Pram services
  • 17 Post Office
  • 19-21 House’s Stores (Players cigarettes, Ariel washing powder)
  • 23 The White House Florist, Fruiterer & Greengrocer
  • 39 Southern Electricity Service
  • 43 Co-operative Food Hall (now two modern shop buildings)
  • 47 Hankins Ltd: Garage and Petrol Pumps (now the Co-op)
  • 49 Dedman’s Grocers, Tobacconist & Newsagent
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These shops look different in 2016 – Moda Rosa and Hetre!

Broad Street (East side)

  • (1 East Street) Lawrence Stationer & Tobacconist
  • 2  Horse & Groom pub
  • 4  Cubitt & West House and Land Agent
  • 6  Hobby Horse – Antiques & Bric-a-Brac
  • 12 Joseph Atkins
  • 14 Kelsall Food Markets (now Tesco)
  • 20 County Library
  • 28 Westminster Bank
  • 30 Chas Eddolls Ltd: Drapery, Clothing, Footwear & Carpets
  • 32 Tylers Wine Stores (now Pizza Express)
  • 36 Broadway Motors (John Allen) (now three modern private residences)
  • 38 (Unidentified shopfront)
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What did Joseph Atkins do? Apparently he lived at 13 Edward Terrace. Next door we have the Chinese Take-Away and the Toy Shop occupies the Cubitt & West premises!

The T-Junction and Town Hall

Other pictures of interest are an unfinished sketch of the Wessex Pharmacy, the view down East Street, and a pen and ink picture created from one of Wright’s drawings of the Barclays Bank building.

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Postscript – His earlier Career

Something I read once made me think that Lawrence Wright had strong links with the RIBA, which was reinforced by the comments made on the back cover of ‘Warm and Snug’, quoted in the above story. On the RIBA website, I found that the picture used to illustrate the design for the Lisboa Casino in Macao, dated 1966, is attributed to him as the artist, which confirms the book cover comment that he was a (very skilled) architectural painter. In the Author’s introduction to ‘Clean and Decent‘, he explains that the book arose after he was invited by Molly Montgomery, who ran the Building Exhibition at Olympia in the late 1950s, to organise a ‘Feature’ display stand at the show, on the theme of The History of the Bathroom. The book inevitably followed: but was a side-line, writing books was just an offshoot from his main works.

Nevertheless, one sentence from his intro to ‘Warm and Snug‘, which explains why his history does not cover the most recent 50 years, is of relevance to all modern historians: “There is no future in writing the history of the present before it is past”.

RIBA advise that he had a further book published in 1983: ‘Perspective in perspective’, published in London by Routledge & Kegan Paul.

(c) Nick Denbow 2016

 

Shop changes of Alresford over 30 years

There’s a lot of data available on the businesses active in the town over the past years. I did a survey of them in 1986, so thought a 2016 survey, 30 years on, would be interesting. Remarkably, there are very few of the original 1986 businesses still trading! At least under their old public facing names.

Broad Street – East side…….  1986 vs 2016

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West Street – North side…….  1986 vs 2016

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West Street – South side…….  1986 vs 2016

 

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Broad Street – West side…….  1986 vs 2016

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2016-broad-street-west-side

The Alresford Museum holds further survey data for earlier years, such as 1947, and 1965 – the latter via the drawings made by Lawrence Wright, which will feature in a future article. Meanwhile the Lawrence Wright drawings are on display in the Community Centre. Notably the Sun Hill Schools conducted regular surveys recording the names of businesses in the town, dating back to at least 1971 (See the story on AlresfordMemories titled ‘Local history, as recorded by Sun Hill School’, and published on 28 January 2016). School history projects relating to the town are eligible for financial support from the Arthur Stowell Fund, associated with the Alresford Museum, and administered by the New Alresford Town Trust.

(c) Nick Denbow 2016

 

 

 

Cat plague: Good or bad?

There is a cat plague in Alresford, around Carisbrooke Close and Orchard Close in particular, and to my knowledge. This is not just a problem of cats leaving their mess in any cultivated vegetable patches, it has grown to involve regular, even daily, bird kills, mainly pigeons, but also young blackbirds.

I am delighted that the pigeons now appear to have moved away, as a result, so that is a major benefit!

But as a carp pond owner, it is true that the occasional cat is seen to lick their lips alongside the water, but there are further pond level defences that stop them getting at the fish. They are amateurs compared to the herons around here, from which we need to defend ourselves rigorously.

The beneficiaries of this phase of cat trespassing have been suppliers such as Homebase and even the Winchester Pound shop, one of whom (guess who?) sell wire netting at very reasonable prices – yes, you’ve guessed it, £1. I recommend their metal mesh fencing, for use on top of a six foot wooden fence. Maybe the cats cannot see it when they shoot up the fence, but I really hope they then get the message with the next 6 inches to a foot of wire net, with spikes on the top.

The wire netting has now grown up above fences and gates to stop these feline climbers getting into back gardens along their regular routes. They may climb up, but they will not get over! If they get into our back garden, I’m not sure they will ever get out…..

I look forward to responses from all the irresponsible cat owners who send their cats out every morning, they will undoubtedly send some sort of justification to defend the misery they inflict on all their innocent neighbours.

Local history, as recorded by Sun Hill School

There was a time, in 1971, when the children at Sun Hill School took an interest in recording what they saw in terms of the businesses in Alresford, and what they knew of the history of the buildings in the town centre. This was recorded, in 1971, and shown to later generations of students to pass this history on, and encourage them to look around. The pages showing the results of the survey were copied by my son, when he then studied at Sun Hill in 1982.

The results are presented in the listings below: where they are incomplete, there are possibly private houses between the shops, and these are not always noted. The house numbers are shown first. On the line after this 1971 record, are the results of a survey done in 1986, inspired by this start from Sun Hill School, and some of the survey done by my son’s class at Sun Hill in around 1982. I apologize that this website does not like tabulations!

Broad Street, West side:

1             Parts of the “New Inn”: In 1893, A.Yates lived here, and his horse won the Grand National

3             Parts of the “New Inn”: Florist. TV Shop.                 1986: Fruit and veg shop

5             Gedye: TV & Radio                                          1986: Derek Gedye Radio & Electrical

7             A Livingstone, Butcher                                  1986: Carpets & Curtains

9             Clunes cleaners. Dress shop. Flair Cleaners             1986: Flair Dry Cleaners

11           Feltmaker. Skins. Shoes. Draper                                1986: Stiles China & Glass

13           Grocer. Barber. Coach Office                                      1986: ?

15           Gladstone: Draper and clothes. Stiles                       1986: Stiles ironmongers

17           Howe: clockmaker. Dedman: milk. Oxley: books      1986: Laurence Oxley’s bookshop

19           “Marilyn”. “Broad St Salon”: Hairdresser    1986: “Broad St Salon”: Hairdresser

21           Grocer & Baker. Tea Rooms                    1986: Godwin House Georgian Tea Rooms

23           “Anchor” Pub. GPO. Nursery school                        1986: Old Post House

27           Doctors. Mary Russell Mitford born here. School

29-31    Previously Private house, plus butcher and candle-maker. Attorney, Doctor and Dentist

39           Private house                                                              1986: Antique shop

41           Evans & Evans clocks

43           (Cranley) Home of the Hall family (Flour millers)

49           Batchelor’s Mineral Water and China

 

Broad Street, East side:

                                                                                                  1986:Lawrence’s

2             Pub: Horse & Jockey, then Horse & Groom       1986: Horse & Groom

4             Grocer & baker, Estate Agent                             1986: Cubitt & West Estate Agents

6-8         Hobby Horse. Candle-maker, then Saddler & Harness maker                                   ……………… 1986: Chinese Take-away

10-14     Kelsall: Mini supermarket and grocer                1986: Kelsall Grocery

20-28     The buildings of the George Inn, operating 1415 to 1927: owned by Winchester College

20           Library. Boot repairer                                  1986: Hampshire County Library

28           Westminster Bank. Estate Agents               1986: Marshall Bendall Estate Agents

32           Wine shop. Wine bar                                    1986: Bodega Wine Bar

34-40     On the site of “Le Hart” pub, dating from 1552 to 1689

34           Telephone Exchange                                   1986: Private house

36-40     Chris Lenz: garage                                      1986: Chris Lenz: garage

40           Godwins Grocery 1920-30.

44           Blacksmith’s house

46           Blacksmith’s Smithy and Forge                             1986: Old Smithy

48           Vet and Doctor’s surgery and house

50           Brewery, Orphanage. Beehives     1986: Old Mill House. 9th US 47th Infantry HQ

52           Home of Dairy Farmer (In the 50’s, Miss Pingleton, and her friend, bred goats here!)

54           Old Fire Station

 

West Street, North side:

2             Wessex Chemist                                        1986: Wessex Chemist

4             Hazelgrove: butcher                                 1986: (National chain of) Butcher

6             Saddlers                                                     1986: Tobacconist

8             Anderson’s: Fishmonger and Greengrocer            1986: Still called Anderson’s

10           Jackman’s Electrical shop                                        1986: Gift Shop

12           Bell Hotel                                                                   1986: The Bell Hotel

14           Routledge café                                                           1986: Private house

16           Itchen Antiques                                                         1986: Artemesia Antiques

18           Lex Leather shoes                                                     1986: Hines Footwear

20           Woodland Tobacco                                                    1986: Watercress Travel

22           Reg Cutting antiques                                                 1986: Candover Gallery

24           Office

24a        Ann Verity: Hairdresser                                                1986: Pastimes Toys

26           Bay Tree House Antiques                                             1986: Pastimes Crafts

34           Private house                                                                 1986: Kitchen centre

36           Westholme

38           Berukin                                                                            1986: Dentist

40           Antiques                                                                          1986: Evans & Evans Clocks

40a        M.P.Stoodley: Jewellers                                         1986: Stoodley Jewellers

42           Sweetland Baker                                                            1986: Tapestry Centre

44           John Irwin Hairdresser                                                  1986: Bread shop

46           Waring Bookshop                                                          1986: Delicatessen

48           ASMI Ltd Petfood

50           Pat’s Pantry Confectioners                                          1986: Tiffin Tearoom

52           Prior’s second hand furniture                                     1986: Design Realities

56           Wilstead Chemist                                                          1986: Goode: Chemist

58           Perins Newsagents                                                        1986: Newsagent

60           Mr Howarth’s café                                         1986: Old School House Restaurant

 

West Street, South side, from Station Road downhill!

13           Turner’s Cycles and Toys                                             1986: A&S Fruiterer’s

15           Post Office                                                                     (2013: Gone!)

17           Post Office                                                                     (2013: Gone!)

19           Wine stores                                                    1986: Peter Dominic off licence

23           Clunes Cleaners

27           Flowers & Greengrocery                                1986: Oliver’s Flower shop

29           Antiques

33           Langton Antiques                                           1986: Gore Langton Antiques

35           (Volunteer Arms)                                           1986: Charms and Clipper Stationers

39           Electricity Showroom                                    1986: Halliwell’s Leather Goods

43           Co-op Grocery                                   1986: Co-op – (2013: now two new shops!)

45           Allders private house (The Hankins)

47           Hankins Garage                                              (2013: Now the Co-op)

49           Dedman Grocers                                             1986: Gillian Ellen and Brambles

 

So what is all this worth?

Arthur Stowell

Arthur Stowell

Nothing, in monetary terms. Lots, to a local historian. But another answer is, we all have an interest in our own history, understanding how our surroundings were created. Arthur Stowell understood this, as an ex-schoolteacher, when he moved to Alresford in around 1980. He lived in the Riverside Cottages in The Dean, and his book, “The story of Alresford” was published by the Alresford Historical and Literary Society at the turn of the Century. Because he was a teacher, Arthur wanted to pass on his enthusiasm to future generations. So in his Will he endowed a fund (Ref 1) to make financial awards to school projects that encourage children to take an interest in history, particularly the history of the area of Alresford.

Because of the rigorous requirements of the school curriculum, few of these grants have been taken up. One recent donation was made to Cheriton Primary School for help with an activity sand-pit, where the children use metal detectors to locate items buried in the sand! Maybe further ideas in infants schools along these lines can be suggested, or after school clubs in the older kid’s establishments could take up the idea.

Nick Denbow

Ref 1: New Alresford Town Trustees, www.towntrust.org.uk, Arthur Stowell Fund.

April 2016 Update

One of the latest additions to the Alresford Museum collection of old archives and memorabilia is a hand-drawn map of the Alresford streets, giving house numbers and house names, and in some cases the occupant’s or trader’s names. This together with the similar 1552 survey of the centre of the town, published by Isabel Sanderson and also available in the Museum, would make an interesting history project.

See also the earlier story on this website: https://alresfordmemories.wordpress.com/2015/02/05/encouraging-school-projects-in-local-studies/